Friday, July 31, 2015

Russia Shoots Down “US Stealth Coup”: Tough Times for America’s “Color Revolution” industry.

    Global Research, July 31, 2015
    New Eastern Outlook 31 July 2015
    Times are tough for America’s “color revolution” industry. Perfected in Eastern Europe after the fall of the Soviet Union, and honed during the so-called “Arab Spring,” the process of backing subversion in a targeted country and overthrowing a sitting government under the cover of staged mass protests appears to be finally at the end of running its course.

    That is because the United States can no longer hide the fact that it is behind these protests and often, even hide their role in the armed elements that are brought in covertly to give targeted governments their final push out the door. Nations have learned to identify, expose, and resist this tactic, and like Adolf Hitler and the Nazi regime’s tactic of Blitzkrieg or “lighting war,” once appropriate countermeasures are found, the effectiveness of lighting fast, overwhelming force be it military or political, is rendered impotent.

    This was most recently observed in Armenia during the so-called “Electric Yerevan” protests – Yerevan being the capital of Armenia, and “electric” in reference to the alleged motivation of protesters – rising electric prices.

    American-backed “color revolutions” always start out with a seemingly legitimate motivation, but soon quickly become political in nature, sidestepping many of the legitimate, practical demands first made, and focusing almost entirely on “regime change.” For the Armenian agitators leading the “Electric Yerevan,” they didn’t even make it that far and spent most of their initial momentum attempting to convince the world they were not just another US-backed mob.

    The Stealth Coup 
    Nikol Pashinyan and his “Civic Contract” party are transparently US-backed. So many found it suspicious that he was the most prominent voice insisting that the “Electric Yerevan” was not political and by no means a US-backed movement.

    Verelq, an Armenian-based news website which inexplicably links to the US State Department’s Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty Armenian site, would report in their article, “Nikol Pashinyan: Protest actions in Yerevan are of exclusively social nature,” that:
    “Even if you look at the ongoing processes through the microscope, you cannot see any foreign political or domestic political components in the demonstrations. People do not want electricity to grow in price. That’s all,” said Pashinyan. He said electric power is first of all a product: the Electric Networks sells it and the citizens buy it. “The protest actions should be considered as protection of consumers’ rights. Politics is nowhere near,” he said.
    But politics were very near, including politicians like Pashinyan himself, who made it a point to visit jailed protesters throughout the failed uprising and even at one point called for the construction of a “human wall” of prominent Armenian personalities between protesters and police. US State Department-funded Armenia Now (of the New Times Journalist Training Center) reported in their article, “Politics in the Middle: Lawmakers, public figures form “human wall” between police, protesters,” that:
    The appeal to create a human wall was made by opposition lawmaker Nikol Pashinyan late on Tuesday as he urged all former and current MPs, scholars, show-biz representatives, lawyers, reporters, religious representatives and other public figures to visit the standoff site in order to ensure no force is applied against the protesters.
    Other obvious ties between the protests, Pashinyan, and US-backed NGOs have been laid out by geopolitical analyst Andrew Korybko in his article, “‘Electric Yerevan’ is Sliding Out of Control.”
    Despite these links, some have attempted to claim Pashinyan was merely an opportunist and that his US-backing, and attempts by US NGOs to manipulate the protests had little to do with the protests themselves. But nothing could be further from the truth.

    Stealth Agitators

     America’s next generation of “color revolutions” attempt to obfuscate all possible ties between themselves and their agitators in an attempt to take back the strategic initiative by maintaining maximum plausible deniability. But if one knows where to look, they will find that no amount of obfuscation and subterfuge can cover the links between the US State Department and its mobs.
    The protests were the work of  the “No To Plunder” group, led by lawyers and activists emanating from the US State Department National Endowment for Democracy (NED), USAID, and Open Society-funded Armenian Young Lawyers Association (AYLA) and the Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly Vanadzor Office who openly coordinated efforts with “No To Plunder” to pressure the government on a number of issues.

    At least 2 members of AYLA, Ara Gharagyozyan and Arthur Kocharyan, were identified as core members of “No To Plunder.”  AYLA’s news website “Iravaban” would list a number of young lawyers and activists attending one of its internship programs in 2014. Iravaban would also cover the protests in intricate detail from start to end, as well as report on activities AYLA and the Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly Vanadzor Office undertook to support the protests.

    A number of other pro-protest “news sites” included Hetq, which while it admits it is funded by convicted financial criminal George Soros’ Open Society Foundation, does not list the US NED as a sponsor – NED however does list Hetq. There is also, funded by USAID as well as the European Endowment for Democracy. All of this adds up to a large network of locally-based but foreign funded and directed media outlets that help add the illusion of consensus to disinformation spread regarding the protests.

    Together with US-funded training programs indoctrinating students and training lawyers and activists in the finer arts of sedition, then allowing them to go off on their own to lead mobs, the US believes sufficient plausible deniability has been created to hide ties between themselves and protest leaders. Similar efforts have been made in both Hong Kong and more recently in Thailand, where overtly US-backed mobs have been replaced by students trained, then unleashed by US-proxies.
    Despite this careful arrangement, the “Electric Yerevan” protests never reached critical mass. The reason for this is simple – they were suspected of being US-backed and the more overt US assets that would eventually need to move in to lead the protests were unable to, lest they confirmed that suspicion and undermined the entire effort. Without these more mainstream assets moving in and providing support, larger protests are logistically and politically impossible.

    How to Shoot Down a Stealth Coup
    Russia’s emerging media influence on the world stage played an essential role in unmasking and disrupting America’s efforts to destabilize and overthrow the government in Armenia. The ability to be one step ahead of the Western-narrative and expose the players before they even take to the stage, meant that people already knew what to look for.

    When the protesters hit the streets, and as the protests dragged on, US NGOs and Western media reports supporting the protests confirmed initial Russian warnings. When clumsy, overt assets like Pashinyan began getting involved, there was little doubt that electrical prices, while a real point of contention, were being used as a means to create a larger, more disruptive, and ultimately dangerous attempt at foreign-backed regime change.

    In the future, the government of Armenia should be careful about giving such points of contention for foreign interests to use in the first place – meaning that dedication to economic and social progress cannot be ignored, even if one is confident they can tamp down potential protests.

    Other nations around the world have a lot to learn from how Russia disrupted this latest attempt by America to project power beyond its shores and disrupt the lives of a sovereign people thousands of miles away. By simply informing people of what is really going on, following the money, and exposing the players involved, people in Armenia were able to assess for themselves whether or not to support the mobs – they chose wisely not to. Were Armenia to adopt similar laws as Russia’s regarding NGOs – mandating that they declare openly and often their foreign funding – people can better assess whether or not mobs these NGOs are supporting are truly marching for their interests, or Wall Street and Washington’s.

Disclaimer: The contents of this article are of sole responsibility of the author(s). The Centre for Research on Globalization will not be responsible for any inaccurate or incorrect statement in this article. The Center of Research on Globalization grants permission to cross-post original Global Research articles on community internet sites as long as the text & title are not modified. The source and the author's copyright must be displayed. For publication of Global Research articles in print or other forms including commercial internet sites, contact: contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available to our readers under the provisions of "fair use" in an effort to advance a better understanding of political, economic and social issues. The material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving it for research and educational purposes. If you wish to use copyrighted material for purposes other than "fair use" you must request permission from the copyright owner.
For media inquiries:

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Bill Cosby's daughter, Erinn, talks sexual assault by Mike Tyson; relationship with father

Bill Cosby's daughter, Erinn, talks sexual assault by Mike Tyson; relationship with father.

         Published on Feb 27, 2015
Bill Cosby's daughter, Erinn, talks sexual assault by Mike Tyson; relationshop with father Greg Garrett  1992
Do you believe Erinn had any inkling of her father's proclivities?


This is so ironic. Erinn Cosby having a run in with Mike Tyson, accusing him of attempted rape. Her reaction to being assaulted by a well known celebrity is quite poignant. She admits her mental state and her use of drugs, but does seems to be a bit guarded in her words.

It's the world of Sports/Entertainment. Wine, Women, Drugs and Sex. Now looking at the current allegations against Bill Cosby, why on God's Green Earth would Cosby upset the apple cart when his own apple cart was full of worms. So, to keep all things "in the family" Cosby didn't bring his daughters accusations against Mike Tyson out into the public eye but suggested getting help for Mike Tyson.  See video below.

Imagine how much courage it would have given the women who have accused Cosby from that era to come out against him if he attacked Mike Tyson? Imagine the outrage they would have felt if they saw him moralizing against something that he has been "allegedly" doing himself?

So, yeah, in the police force, they call it the Blue Line, where they protect one another. I don't know what they call it in Sports/Entertainment/Politics but many scandals are swept right under the rug, and the bigger they are as celebrities the quick and easy fix is in, automatically. And then again, there comes that time when, for whatever reason, known or unknown, the "fix" don't work no more.
What I truly like about this video is how it shows a woman who has been violated and the many nuances of that and its impact on her as a human being. It shows her fears, confusion, need to be supported by her family, and the pressure of the society to bring to the fore something about a "big, powerful" man who has a lot of fans and backing. Who would believe her? Did she get paid to tell or did she get paid to shut up? The scrutiny that a woman would be subjected to; i.e., doubts and innuendos about her character, family relations, mental state, academic history, etc. all play a role in shaping the reaction of any woman in the position of being violated by a "popular" man or any man for that matter..

This is so incredibly ironic some 23 years later..... with Cosby "Himself" being exposed. 

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Commentary by Nana Baakan: MODERN HIGH QUALITY WOMEN

Commentary by Nana Baakan: MODERN HIGH QUALITY WOMEN

I don't agree with all that he says, but he really does have some strong points.

When I was in college I had a dynamic Professor and she would talk about stuff like this in terms of how we are kinda mixed up on what we perceive as what we want in a male partner, etc., etc., She really made me think about myself as a mother, wife and sister and how we actually do enable our men on too many levels in our efforts to make them be"???"  She said that because we knew that the Slave master was frightened of the power and strength of black men, in order to protect them, women would coddle their boys. These coddled boys became men who were literally dis-empowered and ineffective when it came to forming healthy partnerships.  One of the things that is so important to note is that without a societal construct that supports the male/female and familial construct and without the societal expectations matching, Black men are literally thrust into a whirlwind of inconsistencies and incongruities because it just don't match up.

I don't think that traditional matriarchal societies are non-supportive of the male energy. I think that traditional matriarchal societies recognize the role and purpose of both males and females and honor both, but because every one is born through/from a female, like the earth produces, the woman brings forth, so in that vein she has respectability and is highly regarded. This expands and expresses itself through the way that matriarchal society folks take care of the land, animals and nature overall. Women farm and men are taught to cook, sew, and various other crafts.  There's no stigma attached to a man being able to cook, clean, sew, etc.  But men hunt, protect and provide for their family's security. Women run the market place. Men are the political leaders; in general but even here there is a sharing of responsibilities considering what is needed.

Often times, matriarchal societies include the concept of the extended family, community, village, clan, etc. So the support system is there.  When Africans were enslaved, they were thrusted into a totally alien environment, with different morals, preceps, values and lifestyle. That in and of itself caused mental distortions of various degrees, Post Traumatic Slave Disorder, if you will.


I think  that it's the western world's ideology and dominion over lifestyle and it's definition of what male/female relationships should look like; what family structures should look like, that is perpetuated across the relationship/familial landscape and even they know the model doesn't work or is ineffective, hence the high rate of divorce and broken families in the Western Patriarchal world.


I think that there is a middle ground, where mutual responsibility for the cultivation, sustenance and maintenance of a society can be shared by all involved. That with mutual respect and understanding and allowing individuals to reach their fullest potential with an air of cooperation; healthy relationships across the spectrum of human interactions can be achieved. I believe that no extremes are good and that there is something to learn from a comparative study of the matriarchal and patriarchal constructs, but with all historical indicators considered and not in a vacuum and certainly not using the present day dysfunctional societies as a yardstick.


Friday, July 24, 2015

Racist Killing Fields in the U.S.: The Death of Sandra Bland Posted on Jul 23, 2015 By Henry A. Giroux, Truthout

Racist Killing Fields in the U.S.: The Death of Sandra Bland

Posted on Jul 23, 2015
By Henry A. Giroux, Truthout

Sandra Bland, 28 years old
On July 9, soon after Sandra Bland, a 28-year-old African-American woman, moved to Texas from Naperville, Illinois, to take a new job as a college outreach officer at her alma mater, Prairie View A&M, she was pulled over by the police for failing to signal while making a lane change. What followed has become all too common and illustrates the ever-increasing rise in domestic terrorism in the United States. She was pulled out of the car by the police for allegedly becoming combative, and was pinned to the ground by two officers. A video obtained by ABC 7 of Bland’s arrest “doesn’t appear to show Bland being combative with officers but does show two officers on top of Bland.”

A witness reported that “he saw the arresting officer pull Bland out of the car, throw her to the ground and put his knee on her neck while he arrested her.” In the video, Bland can be heard questioning the officers’ methods of restraint. She says: “You just slammed my head to the ground. Do you not even care about that? I can’t even hear.” She was then arrested for assaulting an officer, a third-degree felony, and interned at the Waller County, Texas, jail. On July 13, she was found dead in her cell. Quite unbelievably, the police reported that she took her own life, and the Waller County Jail is trying to rule her death a suicide. Friends and family say that this scenario is inconceivable, given what they know about Sandra: She was a young woman starting a new job, who was eagerly looking forward to her future.

Sandra Bland was an outspoken civil rights activist critical of police brutality. She often posted videos in which she talked about important civil rights issues, and once stated: “I’m here to change history. If we want a change we can really truly make it happen.”

Sandra Bland’s family and friends believe that foul play was involved in her death, and rightly so. Their belief is bolstered by the fact that the head sheriff of Waller County, Glenn Smith, who made the first public comments about Bland’s in-custody death, was suspended for documented cases of racism when he was chief of police in Hempstead, Texas, in 2007. After serving his suspension, more complaints of racism came in, and Smith was actually fired as chief of police in Hempstead.”
Bland’s death over a routine traffic stop is beyond monstrous. It is indicative of a country where extreme violence is the norm - a society fed by the legacy of slavery, Jim Crow, the incarceration state, the drug wars and the increasing militarization of everything, including the war on Black youth. There is more at stake here than the fact that, as federal statistics indicate, the police are “31 percent more likely to pull over a Black driver than a white driver”: Routine traffic stops for Black drivers contain the real possibility of turning deadly. This regular violence propels a deeply racist and militarized society. It is a violence that turns on young people and adults alike who are considered disposable. This type of harassment is integral to a form of domestic terrorism in which Black people are routinely beaten, arrested, incarcerated and too often killed. This is the new totalitarianism of the boot-in-your-face racism, one in which the punishing state is the central institution for both controlling poor people of color and enforcing the rules of the financial elite. How much longer can this war on youth go on?

CONFIRMED: Dashcam Video of Sandra Bland’s Violent Arrest was Indeed Edited Read more at 

The United States has become a country that is proud of what is should be ashamed of. How else to explain the popularity of the racist and bigot, Donald Trump, among the Republican Party’s right-wing base? We celebrate violence in the name of security and violate every precept of human justice through an appeal to fear. This speaks clearly to a form of political repression and a toxic value system. Markets and power are immune to justice, and despise it. All that matters is that control - financial and political - serves soulless markets and the Darwinian culture of cruelty. How many more young people are going to be killed for walking in the street, failing to signal a lane shift, looking a police officer in the eye, or playing with a toy gun? How many more names of Black men, women and young people will join the list of those whose deaths have sparked widespread protests: Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Tamir Rice, Freddie Gray, Renisha McBride, Aiyana Jones and Sakia Gunn, among many others - and now, Sandra Bland. Is it any wonder that one funeral director in Chicago stated that “young people in the city do not expect to live late into their adult life”? Moreover, police violence in the United States is not only a direct manifestation of state violence, but also serves as a gateway to prison, especially for people of color and the poor.

Yet, the mainstream media is more infatuated with game shows, financial brutishness, celebrities and the idiocy of Donald Trump than they are concerned about the endless violence waged against poor children of color in the United States. This violence speaks clearly to a society that no longer wants to invest in its youth. And if one measure of a democratic society is how it treats young people, the United States has failed miserably.

The form that the “war on terror” has taken at home is a war on poor people of color, especially Black people. Racism and police militarization have created a new kind of terrorism, one in which extreme violence is being used against Black people for the most trivial of infractions. The killing of Black youth by the police - a norm that stretches back, in an unbroken line of terror, to slavery - takes the form of both routine affair and spectacle. Nowadays, acts of domestic terrorism perpetrated by police take place increasingly in full view of the US public, who more and more are witnessing such lawlessness after it is recorded and uploaded onto the internet by bystanders. New technologies now enable individuals to record such violence in real time and make it a matter of public record. While this public display of the deployment domestic terrorism is undeniably crucial, in that it makes visible the depravity of state violence, these images are sometimes co-opted by the mass media, commodified, and disseminated in ways that can exploit - and even attempt to erase - Black lives, as William C. Anderson argues.

In the current environment, racial violence is so commonplace that when it is perpetrated by the police against innocent people, justice is not measured by holding those who commit the violence accountable. The official measure of justice is simply that the presence of violence be noted, by the authorities and the mainstream media. Few of the most powerful people seem distraught by the ongoing shootings, beatings, and killings of African-Americans in a society in which a Black man is killed every 28 hours in the US by police, vigilantes or security guards.

6 Things You Should Know About The County Where Sandra Bland Died

This part of Texas has a long, complicated relationship with race.

In a country in which militarism is viewed as an ideal and the police and soldiers are treated like heroes, violence becomes the primary modality for solving problems. One consequence is that state violence is either ignored, rendered trivial or shamelessly legitimated in the name of the law, security or self-defense. State violence fueled by the merging of the war on terror, the militarization of all aspects of society, and a deep-seated, ruthless and unapologetic racism is now ubiquitous and should be labeled as a form of domestic terrorism. Terrorism, torture and state violence are no longer simply part of our history; they have become the nervous system of an increasingly authoritarian state. Eric Garner told the police as he was being choked to death that he could not breathe. His words also apply to democracy itself, which is lacking the civic oxygen that gives it life. The United States is a place where democracy cannot breathe.

This authoritarianism fueled by the mainstream press, which seems especially interested in stories in which it can (wrongfully) frame victims as assailants, as in the case of Trayvon Martin and Michael Brown, but is less interested when the old stereotypes about crime and Black culture cannot be invoked. When dominant forces cannot figure out a way to label victims of police violence “thugs” - consider the case of Tamir Rice, who was only 12 years old when shot to death by a policeman who in his previous police assignment in another city was labeled as “unstable” - such acts of state terrorism often fade out of the mainstream view.

Why was there not a more sustained and mainstream public outcry over the case of Kalief Browder, a young Black man who was arrested for a crime he did not commit and incarcerated at the notorious Rikers Island for than a one thousand days - two years of that time in solitary confinement - waiting for a trial that never happened? Shortly after being released he committed suicide. Would this have happened if he were white, middle class and had access to a lawyer? How is what happened to him parallel to the egregious torture inflicted on innocent children at Abu Ghraib prison?

Not surprisingly, the discourse of “terrorism” once again is only used when someone is engaged in a plot to commit violence against the government - but not when the state commits violence unjustly against its own citizens. What needs to be recognized, as Robin D. G. Kelley has pointed out, is that the killing of unarmed African Americans by the police is not simply a matter that speaks to the need for reforming the police and the culture that shapes it, but also for massive organized resistance against a war on Black youth that is being waged on US soil. The call for police “reform,” echoed throughout the dominant media, is meaningless. We need to change a system steeped in violence, racism, economic corruption and institutional rot. We don’t need revenge, we need justice - and that means structural change.

Sandra Bland's family 'infuriated' at video of her arrest

Ending police misconduct is certainly acceptable as short-term goal to save lives, but if we are going to prevent the United States from becoming a full-fledged police state serving the interests of the rich who ensconce themselves in their gated and guarded communities, the vicious neoliberal financial and police state has to be dismantled. Such resistance has taken shape with the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement, along with youth movements such as the Black Youth Project, Million Hoodies, We Charge Genocide and other groups.

A new brutalism haunts America, drenched in the flood of intolerable police and state violence. Millions of people are being locked up, jailed, beaten, harassed and violated by the police and other security forces, simply because they are Black, Brown, young and/or poor, and therefore viewed as disposable. Black youth are safe neither in their own neighborhoods nor on public streets, highways, schools - or any other areas in which the police can be found.

Source:  TruthDig

Thursday, July 9, 2015

The Dream Team "Voices Of Africa" Choral & Percussion Ensemble

"Voices Of Africa" Choral and Percussion Ensemble

You know, they say follow your dreams pursue your dreams, live your dreams and all that other jazz and stuff and all.

Sometimes dreams are simply on another timeline, in another cycle, to be actualized in another reality. I guess what we have to do is determine, what cycle the dream is in and whether or not it can be made to align within the cycle where we become aware of it.

In other words, "Voices Of Africa" Choral and Percussion Ensemble was my dream. A dream of having a family of performing artists who were gifted and talented and well rounded, working in harmony and striving to do something great to impact and change the world we live in.

When I think about it now... I shift from pain to joy, from joy to pain.. as it was the most amazingly joyful experience as well as the most amazingly painful one.

My dream was to do it, and do it well, through the vehicle of African music, children's songs, dance and fun! We traveled all over the country and we even went to Ghana, and the UK!! We saw many members come and go, but the strong survived, me and my two daughters. We went through marriages and babies and college and jobs and relocations and you name we did it. We were even stranded in Iowa on that fateful day in Sept. 11, 2001.

We navigated through losses and gains and not only in poundage. We did it and yet, it was painful.. on many levels that I could not understand and did not understand until recently.. I would say, just a couple of years ago.

It was a dream that only I had.. it was a dream that only held meaning on an intrinsic level to me. It was my desire to be a "Partridge Family" on the black hand side! Ha, those young folks who were with me, knew nothing of the Partridge Family, nor did they care about them, besides, who said so anyway?? It was my desire to create a family musical group to overshadow my own feelings of abandonment from my own family and the feeling of loss from my one living parent and my one missing parent. The Isolation I felt growing up as a child was hard to bear, yet I wonder if my push to be something that my children could not relate to caused them the same feelings of isolation.

This dream turned out to be more than I would have ever envisioned as it required all the trappings of a bonafide business enterprise. None of that was displayed in the Partridge family series. It required economic stamina in an climate of rises and falls that devastated our audiences and potential venues.

It required the ability to compete with other organizations, groups, clubs and families who had done this for a much longer period of time, but who also faced the same challenges which made our playing field very narrow and overly competitive. It required the comfort of working with your Mom, who was embarrassing at the tender age she place you on the stage. But more than anything, it require, forgetting, getting over, and even forgiving the many inordinances that occurred between the family members before they hit "the big stage." And that is where the rocky ground made everything else even more difficult to overcome.

At this point in the cycle, I wonder, if I knew then what I know now, if I would have realized that this dream would turn out to be a nightmare because it simply was not in alignment with the reality we, me and my daughters (all members of VOA, whether genetically or not) lived in day to day. Our struggle before, behind and back stage as Mom and daughters was not resolved, concluded or even clear, as it was most transparent for others to see.

We came here to this life time, with some kind of "joint" purpose, whatever that was, it was never conjoined, and my struggle to hold it together while it fell apart around me, really had to do with not knowing what parts to hold on to and what parts to let go. Again, I wonder, if I would have decided to do everything, differently, and follow a totally different course if I was aware of the major road blocks that were preventing this dream of an All Female African American West African Percussion Cultural Music Group from coming true.

I guess I should be fair and say that parts of it did. I should also add that parts of it that I never dreamed of came true as well. But all in all, as I look at this picture, I can't help but wonder.. what would I have done differently, if I knew then, what I know now. For some reason that truth was blocked or guarded as if something outside of myself wanted me to do it anyway, no matter the obstacles. At least I have a hell of a resume' as a result of it; with so many Self taught skills I gained over the 25 years of active duty. I am sure that there were so many blessings that came from this experience and all in all, it was memorable.

I still can't help but wonder.

 The "Voices Of Africa" Choral & Percussion Ensemble
Sisterspace, 2008

My dream is not dead. 
It is happily, naturally, 
Taking place on another time line 
That I can be assured of as I move 
Forward into my later years on this planet
Cause I Still Got It!!!!!